About Us

The Kettle Sings History


In 1897, to mark Queen Victoria’s 60 year reign the cart road leading along the side of the hills from the Wyche Cutting to British Camp was surfaced. In honour of the Queen, it was given the name Jubilee Drive. Ten years later, a small workman’s cottage was built roughly midway along the drive about 100 yards downhill.

Twenty years later, in 1928, the little property was enlarged into a fashionable English tea room by a lady called Miss Millie Stephens, who named it The Kettle Sings. In 1936, Mrs Attridge took ownership of the tearoom and is believed to be the last known resident of the tearoom, later selling it to Mrs Dorothy Herridge during the 1940’s. Dorothy ran the tearoom with her husband who wanted to fulfil a personal dream after retiring from being a butler to Mr C W Dyson Perrins of the Worcestershire Sauce family.

Mr and Mrs Herridge sold the tearoom to Mr and Mrs George Cook who previously ran a hotel in Dalvington, falling in love with the views following a visit to The Kettle Sings. They later moved into retirement, selling the tearoom to Mr John McDonald who was succeeded two years later in 1976 by Mrs Margaret Lampard and her husband Geoffrey. The couple had lived next door to the tearoom since 1945. During the 1990’s, The Kettle Sings closed for two years, to then be reopened complete with a new facelift by Mrs Barbara Teale from Upton.

Despite being closed for two years, The Kettle Sings has been serving tea and cake since 1928. Some remember it purely for that, others remember the days of boiled eggs and a fruit salad (if you were lucky!), whilst some have memories of walking the hills as a child with Granny finishing up with a slice of cake. Although The Kettle Sings has seen many owners over the years, the views across Herefordshire into Wales have stood the test of time.